Greenville Co. Council passes rule limiting septic tanks

Greenville County officials are limiting septic tank construction in its unincorporated areas and ensuring there are more buffers around creeks and creeks. The council voted 11-1 on the rule change Tuesday night. “Continuing to build 200 to 300 housing developments on septic tanks in rural parts of the county is not an efficient use of the limited land we have left,” said Councilman Ennis Fant. “We have a responsibility not only to ourselves, but also to the next generation so that we cannot continue to poison our streams, rivers and streams.” Effective immediately, homes built with a septic tank must have a minimum size of 1.5 lots have and increase buffers that can be up to 100 feet from the nearest river bank. Fant added that the change is intended to improve water quality and help slow growth. “We’re seeing nitrate levels increasing tremendously in the lower parts of the county, so we knew we had to do something,” he said. “We’re poisoning the streams and rivers at an alarming rate, so we had to do something.” “Councilman Chris Harrison was the only person to vote against the rule, saying the minimum lot size was too large. “That reduces the number of properties a developer can use,” Harrison said. “So it can reduce the value of your property” because you won’t be paying as much for it. On the other hand, if the properties are larger, they will be valued higher. They will cost more and the house price will also be higher. “Environmental groups like Upstate Forever supported the change and larger buffers.” These riparian buffer areas are the areas of vegetation next to rivers and streams and are being considered “They are the last line of defense for water quality because they slow and filter runoff,” said Erika Hollis, Director of Clean Water for the organization. Fant said the county needs 4,400 homes a year to keep up with housing demand. He said the county now needs to work with wastewater service providers to convert more homes from septic to sewer lines. “If we want to reduce the number of septic tank homes, we need to build higher density single-family homes,” Fant said. “This means that ReWa and MetroConnects have to become stronger.” The rule change will run for the next two years until a sunset clause comes into force. The council must meet again at the end of the period to vote on whether or not to proceed with the change.

Greenville County officials are limiting septic tank construction in its unincorporated areas and ensuring there are more buffers near creeks and creeks.

The council voted 11-1 on the rule change Tuesday night.

“Continuing to build 200 to 300 housing developments on septic tanks in rural parts of the county is not an efficient use of the limited land we have left,” said Councilman Ennis Fant. “We have a responsibility not only to ourselves, but also to the next generation, so we cannot continue to poison our streams, rivers and streams.”

Effective immediately, homes built with a septic tank must have a minimum lot size of 1.5 lots and larger buffers that can be up to 100 feet from the nearest stream bank.

Fant added that the change is intended to improve water quality and help slow growth.

“We’re seeing nitrate levels rise tremendously in the lower parts of the county, so we knew we had to do something,” he said. “We are poisoning the streams and rivers at an alarming rate, so we had to do something.” rise.

Councilman Chris Harrison was the only one to vote against the rule, saying the minimum lot size was too large.

“That reduces the number of properties a developer can use,” Harrison said. “So it can reduce the value of your property because you don’t have to pay as much for it. However, if the properties are larger, they will be valued higher. They cost more and the house.” The price will also be higher.

Environmental groups like Upstate Forever supported the change and larger buffers.

“These riparian buffer areas are the areas of vegetation adjacent to rivers and streams and are considered the last line of defense for water quality because they slow and filter runoff,” said Erika Hollis, the organization’s clean water director.

Fant said the county needs 4,400 homes per year to keep up with housing demand.

He said the county now needs to work with wastewater service providers to convert more homes from septic to sewer lines.

“If we want to reduce the number of septic tanks, we need to build higher density single-family homes,” Fant said. “This means that ReWa and MetroConnects have to become stronger.”

The rule change applies for the next two years until a sunset clause comes into effect. At the end of the period, the council must meet again to vote on whether or not to proceed with the change.

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