Napa County deals with Hall of Justice toilet pipe leaks

More than 100 Napa County employees have moved or will move from the Hall of Justice in downtown Napa to avoid some of the yuck factor there.

There were water and sewer leaks on the second floor of the county-owned building at 1125 Third St. The overhead toilet pipes serve the prison on the third floor.

“We have sewer pipes leaking on our staff,” District Manager Ryan Gregory said when describing the problem last July.

Napa County has isolated certain areas. About 90 probation department employees were moved to the Juvenile Justice Center and the county’s rehabilitation facility on Highway 221.

Napa County Fire will move next. The county recently signed a five-year lease at 951 California Blvd. approved. in the city of Napa for $14,500 a month, and about a dozen county and Cal Fire employees will begin moving there in mid-January.

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“We’re excited,” said Jason Martin, deputy fire chief for the county.

The Napa County Regional Park and Open Space District will remain on the second floor of the Hall of Justice. County spokeswoman Holly Dawson said the county office was the furthest from the damaged area and was safe.

“They haven’t felt the need to move at this point, and there is also a conference room on the second floor that is still in use,” she said.

Leaks have been an ongoing problem at the Hall of Justice for several years, Dawson said. However, the situation recently reached a critical point as its frequency and severity increased.

The problem was caused by inmates on the third floor of the prison. For example, Dawson said they washed out large objects and discharged fluids into cracks in the ground. These are damaged toilet pipes and the entire plumbing system.

Repairing this network of pipes and crevices is a significant project, Dawson said.

Meanwhile, the county is building a $133 million prison along Highway 221. The new replacement prison is scheduled to open in 2025 and inmates will be relocated there, leaving the Hall of Justice prison empty.

After the inmates are moved, plumbing repairs will be planned at the Hall of Justice, Dawson said. The schedule is at the discretion of the county supervisor and depends on what the supervisor wants to do with the building.

The county is considering establishing an entire government office in downtown Napa. Options mentioned for the Hall of Justice range from renovation into a new administrative building, to demolition to make way for a new district headquarters, to destruction to make way for private sector development.

The Hall of Justice was built in 1976 and expanded in 1989.

More footage from the St. Helena High girls soccer team’s home game against Napa High on December 2nd.

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Photos: The work of the Tug McGraw Foundation in Yountville

Tug McGraw Foundation 7

Veteran Roger Krodel worked at the Tug McGraw Foundation Brain Food Garden in Yountville on Dec. 4.


Nick Otto, Register

Tug McGraw Foundation 2

Tug McGraw Foundation 2

Veterans help clean up the Brain Food Garden that the Tug McGraw Foundation planted on the grounds of the Yountville Veterans Home in 2010.


Nick Otto, Register

Tug McGraw Foundation 3

Tug McGraw Foundation 3

Jennifer Brusstar, CEO of the Tug McGraw Foundation, helped found the nonprofit along with its namesake, the Vallejo native and longtime relief pitcher for the Mets and Phillies before he died of brain cancer in January 2004.


Nick Otto, Register

Tug McGraw Foundation 4

Tug McGraw Foundation 4

Veteran Sally Krodel helps hang drums created by other Yountville Veterans Home residents participating in Tug McGraw Foundation art classes.


Nick Otto, Register

Tug McGraw Foundation 5

Tug McGraw Foundation 5

Lynn Ford, a participant in the Tug McGraw Foundation’s work with veterans, packages Christmas cookies to be sent to veterans’ families on Dec. 4 at the Veterans Home of California in Yountville, where the foundation has its offices.


Nick Otto, Register

Tug McGraw Foundation 6

Tug McGraw Foundation 6

Veterans help remove Halloween decorations from the Tug McGraw Foundation’s Brain Food Garden on the Veterans Home property in Yountville.


Nick Otto, Register

Tug McGraw Foundation 8

Tug McGraw Foundation 8

The Brain Food Garden, which the Tug McGraw Foundation helped create on the grounds of the Yountville Veterans Home in Yountville, grows about 1,000 pounds of produce annually, including vegetables and fruits that are believed to promote brain health.


Nick Otto, Register

Tug McGraw Foundation 9

Tug McGraw Foundation 9

Veteran Gordon Kirby leaves the greenhouse after checking the plants in the Tug McGraw Foundation’s Brain Food Garden at the Yountville Veterans Home.


Nick Otto, Register

Tug McGraw Foundation 1

Tug McGraw Foundation 1

Roger and Sally Krodel, both veterans, clean raised beds at the Tug McGraw Foundation’s Brain Food Garden on the Veterans Home of California campus in Yountville on Dec. 4.


Nick Otto, Register

Reach Barry Eberling at 707-256-2253 or [email protected]

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