Replacement pipes start journey from San Diego to Calgary

Twelve days after a huge water main burst in Calgary, two replacement pipes from San Diego are embarking on a multi-day journey north to help workers there repair five sections.

“These are replacement pipes that we had in our yard and they are the right size for use in Calgary,” Martin Coghill told CTV News.

“The truck just arrived, we’re loading it up and heading out there,” said the San Diego County Water Authority’s operations and maintenance manager.

The two 24-foot-long sections of 77-inch-thick pipe were obtained by the City of Calgary, which reached out to agencies across North America for help finding materials to fix the five “hotspots.”

The pipes weigh 12,500 pounds and will be trucked to Calgary this week.

Before the pieces began their three- to four-day journey, workers signed the cylinders with “good luck” messages for workers in Calgary to read before they were placed along 16th Avenue NW.

“I thought a nice little message was deserved and hope it brings good luck to the pipeline and the people of Calgary,” Coghill said.

“We just like to help.”

Twelve days after a huge water main burst in Calgary, two replacement pipes from San Diego are embarking on a multi-day journey north to help workers there repair five sections.

The section with the original break has been repaired and crews continued filling the hole on Monday.

At the same time, two other sections of road were closed to allow for the road to be torn up and the five pipe areas identified last week as needing urgent repairs.

“It will take some time to use forensic investigation to determine what the root cause ultimately is, but it is not uncommon for water pipes to break, collapse or leak,” said Kerry Black, assistant professor in the University of Calgary's Department of Civil Engineering.

However, Black says the extent of the water main burst in Calgary is a cause for concern for Calgary residents.

This should also serve as a warning to communities across North America, Black says.

“I think this is a huge wake-up call. If something like this can happen in a city that maintains its pipelines pretty well, is aware of the challenges in its system and is assessing the condition of the facilities, then this should be a warning sign for other cities as well,” Black said.

You might also like

Comments are closed.